how much do uber drivers make

How Much Do Uber Drivers Make?

Do Drivers Make More Money with Lyft or Uber?

How much do Uber drivers make? The answer to this question will depend on several factors. I drive with Uber on weekends from 9pm to 3am. I choose those specific hours because it’s when there are more ride requests. When I first started with Uber, I wasn’t making that much, but enough to pay a few bills here and there.

Uber drivers can make about $20 an hour on average. Here in Tampa FL, I make between $22$24 an hour. Uber drivers in New York can make over $30 average. If you drive full-time, and depend on your location, you can make as much as $35,000 annually after all expenses.

For many people wanting to get into the world of driving and taxiing, Uber is the way forward. It offers an easy way to get work in an industry which is now almost a certainty. It also offers something that we’ll always need, and ensures that those who don’t want to be tied into a taxi firm can enjoy working for themselves – but how much do uber drivers make?

How much do uber drivers make per hour ?

The basic rate that you can walk away with, presuming you’re a good and active driver and you work hard, is around $20-25 an hour. For many people this blows away the sums they would be making with a normal taxi firm and can make sure that people are bringing in a tidy little sum whilst having a flexible schedule.

How much do uber drivers make part time?

Uber drivers can make between 350-400 dollars for a 20 hour work week.  You can as a part-time job or a full-time job, with good earning potential either way, but don’t quit your job just yet. It’s time to consider some of the more basic elements of working with Uber drivers, such as working out your per-ride cost and your general payment structure. I drive on weekends, about 16 hour or so, and I’m able to make 350 and tips not included.

Uber and Lyft are the two most popular ride sharing companies, and they are at the top with the highest number of drivers and passengers. Their popularity is the main aspect which differentiates these two companies from other ones on the market.

Riders usually request Uber or Lyft due to the availability in the area. Drivers will most likely consider the money they will earn hourly, which brings me to the question, how much do uber drivers make? As a current ride sharing driver, I can tell you that there is more than one aspect you should take into consideration before you go with Lyft or Uber as a driver.

Different Location, Different Earnings!

Both Uber and Lyft have various fares for passengers in different locations. This economic aspect cannot be omitted when you choose between Lyft and Uber, but generally speaking, they have similar price variations for each area.

Let’s see what are some of the most significant values and their tendency of getting lower or higher, according to a study made by SherpaShare last year. The following data reveals the average earning per trip in May 2015, and shows if this went up or down since January, the same year. Based on the study, we’ll be able to answer how much do uber drivers make per fare? 

how much do uber driver make

The winner for the highest gross earnings per trip is undoubtedly Uber. There are only a few regions where Lyft drivers earn more than Uber drivers, and in some of them, such as Denver and Los Angeles, the difference is insignificant – $o.01 and $0.03.

How Much Do Uber Drivers Make? – What to Consider!

When you become a ride share driver for either Lyft or Uber, you need to ask yourself a few questions. How often would you drive? Where is the place that you live? Your pay is affected by the population of the city you live in, so if you live in larger cities, you probably won’t be lacking rides. But keep into account that if you live in a smaller city or rural areas, your pay can be heavily influenced no matter if you’re a Lyft or an Uber driver.

My piece of advice is that you keep a close eye on the city you are in, because as you can see, your pay can be heavily influenced by the population. I mean the more people live in a city, the more passengers that city will have.  In July 2015, Uber drivers were making a lot more money in places such as Phoenix, Seattle or Miami. In contrast to that, Lyft drivers would make a lot more money than Uber in places such as Washington D.C, Austin, and Orange County. So, the place that you’re driving is more of an influencing factor than the actual driving company.

The Cut

As you may have guessed, Uber funds itself by taking a cut of every fare. When someone takes an Uber fare they pay roughly $0.18 for every minute in the car and about $1 per mile. This varies depending on the city and the country you are doing Uber with, by the way, so don’t expect that to be exact.

You also get the Surge hours where prices go higher at certain points in the day, allowing you to get a nicer little earning. However, Uber takes $1 for your Safe Rider Fee now known booking fee, and then 20% of anything else which is going. So you would lose $0.20 for every $1 made as well as a full $1 on top. This means that you can still earn good money but you do have to pay out that little cut.

Take into account your gas expenses and you can find that the earnings are cut down ever so slightly, but if you are making on average $10/11 for every half an hour worked you’ll be making a pretty decent sum for a few hours worked.

Remember that where your location plays a major role – the Uber average is around $19/hour but in bigger cities you can easily pull in $30+ if you work hard and you choose the right times to work. In a good week you could pull in anything from $750-1000 if you work between 30 and 50 hours. That’s pretty good money, wouldn’t you agree?

How much do uber drivers make – Bonuses?

Another important aspect that may contribute to a higher income is represented by the rewards offered by the companies. If you are thinking about signing up as an Uber driver, you will be pleased to find out that any new driver has a substantial bonus of $750 for completing 100 rides before May 1, 2016.

On the other hand, Lyft also has attractive bonuses for new drivers, but they differ from region to region. However, their target is much easier to complete, as for most areas – such as Austin, Denver or Washington D.C. – you need to do only 50 rides within the first 30 days. For San Diego, San Francisco and New York City, you still need to meet a target of 100 trips. The bonuses for the new drivers who should have 50 rides range from $50 to $500, whereas those which require 100 rides are no lower than $200 and may go up to $750.

The Best Times

Many of the best times to work are Friday evening and Saturdays, but for weekdays Monday to Thursday mornings are the best bet as many people need your help getting them to work and to the airport. Use this to your advantage and you can make a bit more money during the week.

Remember that if you are a good driver and your courteous towards your passengers they might give you a little cash tip for your time.

Which Is Better?

Wages constantly change between Uber drivers and Lyft drivers, so the right question wouldn’t be “ How much do Uber drivers make ?” but rather “Which rideshare company pays more at the moment?”

Depending on the city you live or drive, being a ride share driver for Lyft or Uber can be either an exploitative labor practice or a gold mine. Be careful to track your earnings, and, depending on where you live, do your research upon which company is more convenient for you. Everything can differ from driver to driver and from place to place.

  • John

    READ THIS IF YOU REALLY WANT TO KNOW HOW MUCH $$$ YOU MAKE DRIVING
    I have been driver for LYFT and UBER for 1 year and working full time for 9 months. I have completed over 2,200 rides. I have an accounting background and I lost my professional job. Out of desperation, I became a driver for UBER/LYFT. I keep precise records of all income and expense. The bottom line statistics are not at all promising to be a driver. I took precise mileage and earnings figures. For 9 months, I drove 41,291 miles, gross revenues before expenses and taxes were 0.61 cents/mile (including cash/non-cash tips). In my market, average gross revenue for UBER and LYFT is 0.80 cents/mile BEFORE 20% commission paid to UBER/LYFT. Of significance, my gross earnings per mile was 25% higher in 2015 ($1.00/mile), which means that average gross earnings per mile will be LESS in future periods. Thus, my findings at the end of this post are UNDERSTATED. Earnings include prime time and surge pricing. I worked more than full time for 6 months during all optimal times of the day (12+ hours/day, 5+ days/week).
    0.61 cents/mile doesn’t sound bad, right? Well, not until you account for all costs. Actual total costs to drive a 2011 Nissan Altima was $11,829 or $0.29 cents/mile (including fuel, conservative depreciation, insurance, service, cell, and food giveaways. So, net earnings BEFORE taxes were ONLY $0.32 cents/mile. Notice the SHARE of income on a percentage basis is 51% (me) and 49% (them). This is because of the REAL expenses required to do this job reduce the share of gross earnings from 80% to 51%.
    Let me break this down in terms we can all relate to. In order to earn $500/week (net of all expense & before taxes), you have drive 313 miles/day for 5 days/week. 313 miles can be driven in 5.2 hours assuming no stops, regular traffic, and an average speed of 60mph (or 21 rides completed at an avg. of 15 miles/ride). As you are well aware, it is impossible to complete 300+ miles in 5 hours because, of course, you have to make stops, wait for riders, deal with traffic, and determine your next destination. But, let’s say for the sake of argument you could. So, after adjusting for stop, wait, traffic, navigation (an additional & conservative –96 minutes), you have worked over 6 1/2 hours. This is at an average speed of 60mph! A more reasonable assumption would be an average speed of say, 35mph, which would translate to over 11 hours work/day. This translates to an hourly wage (before taxes) of $9.12 per HOUR! Let me also state that 1) I do NOT have commercial insurance, 2) these assumptions do NOT include an adjustment for accident risk, 3) this does NOT include any damage to your vehicle caused by riders, 4) the risk of injury or worse because of undesirable riders, and 5) you still have to pay taxes on any ‘net’ income. So, given these precise calculations, is it still worth it to drive for $9.12/hour BEFORE you pay taxes?
    I know what you are thinking: you receive a direct deposit that is much larger than $9.12/hour, you receive referral bonuses that translate into more $$$ for you, and you think you are better than the average driver so you make more in tips than those ‘other’ losers. Well, have you actually sat down and accounted for all of your expenses? Let me share my personal experience: for 9 months I earned $1,569 in cash tips + 1,461 in LYFT inApp tips, BOTH of WHICH have been already accounted for. What I excluded from the calculation was what I view as “non-recurring” fees earned. Meaning, I believe that future earnings in this category will substantially lower or eliminated entirely. I made a total of $3,660 for 9 months for the following: 1) sign on bonus 2), driver referral for 1 person, and 3)passenger referral fees for over 125 NEW riders to LYFT. So, did you earn an average of over $100/week for referral/sign-on bonuses every week that you worked? That is what I earned. You have to ask yourself how much you have earned from these ‘non-recurring’ and NOT reliable sources of income. Including this non-recurring income, I earned an additional $0.09 cents/mile.
    So, in the final analysis, I made an average of $0.40 cents/mile (including surge pricing, referral fees, tips) in net income, which assuming a 40 hour work week (this is understated) translates to $11.47 PER HOUR. This is BEFORE taxes and BEFORE any of the risk you take as a driver. Is it still worth it?

    • @John… Thanks for break it down like this… What city you’re driving for Uber/Lyft? I understand you lost professional job, but at least whatever you’re making with Uber is better than nothing. That’s a lot of mile you’re putting in a car, do you think it’d be better for you to lease a car? There are so many drivers now, Uber is not what it used to be in terms of making a killing…